supjess:

First, due to my continuing struggle to cope with technology, I managed to delete the cool little video I made of last nights adventure. Fortunately, anyone following along at home can easily replicate the experience by using a Google image search.

This may come as a shock, but living in Los…

supjess:

Day Two: California Science Center

The California Science Center is located in LA’s West Adams district, along with a lot of other neat places such as the Natural History Museum (which I’ve been to a couple of times, but never for one of their cool parties) and the University of Southern California (same). The museum is free to the public if you’re willing to walk past the donation box while some guy in a polo shirt smiles awkwardly at you (suggested donation is $5) and parking is $10, although there is some neighborhood parking on the other side of Exposition Drive if you’re as cheap as I am.

I have to admit, I was a little bit conflicted about this adventure. First of all, like most people who grew up in proximity to a large urban area, I’ve been to science museums many times. The Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago, Discovery and Science in Ft. Lauderdale, and, once, the amazing Exploratorium in San Francisco were all backdrops for super awesome childhood afternoons spent pushing big plastic buttons and playing with dirty water tables under the guise of learning about science.For the record, I suck so much at science that I failed high school chemistry and had to take it again.

Second of all, being a grown up in a science museum is a little bit uncomfortable because a lot of the exhibits are designed for children, and when you show up childless (and look like you’re probably skipping high school, which I do) the museum staff are trained to expect shenanigans. But onward I pressed, in the name of adventure!

At the museum, I got to project myself into a virtual reality soccer game, watch maggots eat a dead rabbit, look at a tiger shark, see a giant man made of fast food wrappers, and stand in a hurricane simulator, along with a bunch of other cool things. I also got to check out a British exhibit they are currently running called 1001 Inventions of the Muslim World, which apparently aims to teach Western kids that Muslims are not scary aliens from another planet, but have in fact been around for a really long time and, just like the other two ancient societies you learn about and the dozens of others you don’t, developed a lot of ideas that we still put into practice today. Also, Secretary of State Hilary Clinton welcomes you to the exhibit via HD video when you’re walking in. Awesome.

This was not an adventure that put me into a terribly uncomfortable place or made me talk to strangers, but it did allow for a couple hours of unstructured play time which is something I don’t get nearly enough of, even as an often-unemployed member of the Allowance Generation. As I was waiting in line behind a bunch of kids to try lifting up the Toyota Tacoma attached to a pulley system in the parking lot, I had a great idea for an adults-only science museum for grown ups to play in all the time. Fortunately, I immediately realized how horribly wrong that would inevitably go, and I’m not going to talk about it anymore.

Coming up on the Do Cool Adventures in February Project*: This evening I’m headed to the Griffith Observatory for a lecture called All Space Considered (topics include both Giant Solar Storms Sparks Fears for the End of the World AND Dark Galaxy Sparks Fear of the End of the World), and tomorrow morning I’m leaving Echo Park at 2:30 AM to climb Sunset Peak with some friends and see my first 360 degree panorama mountain top sunrise. Sunday is still in the works, so please email any ideas to jessica(at)theimaginationplantation(dot)com.

*A fact you may not know about me is I almost always have to read the scratch voice-over track for the TV shows I work on.

I was there too. Though you wouldn’t know it…

good god.

supjess:

The Internet needs this.

lomographicsociety:

Lomography Tag of the Day - angels

lomographicsociety:

Lomography Tag of the Day - angels

lomographicsociety:

The Snowflake Man

Wilson Bentley was the first person to photograph a snowflake up close. Learn more about him and see his snowflake photos after the break.

bzcohen:

Nothing in this photo is more confusing than MJ’s jeans.

bzcohen:

Nothing in this photo is more confusing than MJ’s jeans.

View Large and Read the Whole Story

an oldie, but goodie. i didn’t know these guys broke up  until i searched for this video. bummertime.

this might be more awkward than awesome, but i’m really hoping for awesome.

worth the 3 min…

michetran:

First animated tattoo. A little mind blowing. (via Design Taxi)